Injured firefighter, Rob Boost

Injured Tassie firie needs a helping hand

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Career and volunteer firefighter Rob Boost was doing the job he loved, fighting fires in Tasmanias South West National Park in February 2016, when he was struck on the helmet by a falling branch. He suffered significant injuries from this, and has been on the road to recovery ever since.

According to his go fund me page, the accident “left him with debilitating pain and significant side effects, requiring extensive and ongoing treatment, and effectively unable to work in his full capacity. The effect on his family and quality of life has been more devastating.”

Rob Boost and his loving family
Rob and his loving family

Recently Rob and his family were dealt a blow when the insurance company informed them they would no longer fund some of the treatments prescribed to him by his team specialists and doctors. These treatments include infusions for chronic pain and the trial of a neurostimulator. A neurostimulator is an implantable device and 5cms in diameter the delivers mild electrical signals to the epidural space near the spine, which can provide pain relief by disrupting the pain signals between the spine and the brain, and tricking the brain into believing that there is no pain to be felt.

Rob and his family have already started funding these options themselves but it isn’t cheap, and they have already sold a car and caravan to put towards the costs involved. The go fund me page was created Rob’s collegues, in the hope of raising the rest of the money needed.

Many of Robs colleagues in the Tasmania Fire Service have made pledges, as have various stations across Tasmania, with some stations donating their overtime, and some stations using various other forms of fundraising to help out their firefighting brother. They have almost reached their goal of $50,000 but they need our help. You can donate by visiting the go fund me page here. You can donate as an individual, or you could do a quick whip round on a training night and donate as a station.

We wish Rob and his family all the best on the road ahead.